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A Bright Future for Chilled Beams

A Bright Future for Chilled Beams

This Tech Tip discusses the increasing popularity of active chilled beams due to their energy efficiency and potential lowered floor-to-floor height, smaller ductwork, and reductions in riser and mechanical room footprints.

Impact of Ceiling Type on Terminal Unit Radiated Sound

Impact of Ceiling Type on Terminal Unit Radiated Sound

Many times I have seen ceilings either removed from rooms or changed to a cloud type to add the perception of volume to the space. Many design engineers do not consider the impact on the room sound levels when a ceiling is removed, The impact of changing both liner and ceiling type, and the resultant change in the overall room sound levels.

Low Temperature Air Distribution

Low Temperature Air Distribution

The premise behind the consideration of cold air distribution is often the possibility of reduced mechanical system costs and reduced system energy. It is often applied in conjunction with ice storage systems to take advantage of the low temperature chilled water supplied by those systems.

Condensate and Chilled Beam Cooling Coils

Condensate and Chilled Beam Cooling Coils

As most designers and end users have concerns about the potential for condensation, it is common for the concept of using a condensate pan to be considered. To me, using a condensate pan appears to be an expensive option for active chilled beams, as the beams are often located in the ceiling and would require a condensate pump on each beam, or a sloped ceiling to allow the condensate to properly drain.

What is System Effect?

What is System Effect?

In duct design and installation, system effect is the generation of higher than expected pressure drops through changes in duct direction or geometry. It can also be caused by improper installation of fittings, which result in excessive, unanticipated turbulence in the airflow.

Terminal Unit Sizing: Inlet Valves

Terminal Unit Sizing: Inlet Valves

HVAC designers have several goals to meet when sizing a terminal unit inlet. One is to minimize the sound generation of the terminal unit and the other is to accurately resolve the flow signal at both full cooling and minimum cooling.

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